Hva er Arktisk råd? (‘What is the Arctic Council?’)

Fridtjof Nansen Institute published an article titled, “Hva er Arktisk råd? (‘What is the Arctic Council?’)”. The article reads in part as follows:

The Arctic Council (AC) is frequently referred to as the most important international forum in the Arctic. The AC has produced substantial knowledge on Arctic issues, and informed the debate on challenges and opportunities in the region, ranging from research on climate change, introduction of shipping guidelines and emphasizing regional health issues. It is a significant player in the region as a producer of knowledge, presenter of guidelines and recommendations, Arctic environment assessment and monitoring body, and arena for the drafting of binding international agreements. In this book I look closer at AC’s role in Arctic Governance.

International introductory course “Arctic Council and the role of Permanent participants” in Moscow

UArctic published an article titled, “International introductory course “Arctic Council and the role of Permanent participants” in Moscow”. The article reads in part as follows:

On November 16, representatives of the indigenous peoples of the North of Russia will come to Moscow to participate in the international introductory course “Arctic Council and the role of Permanent participants”. Officials of the Arctic Council will take part in the work. The seminar participants will get acquainted with the work of the Arctic Council and later, together with foreign guests, they will participate in the hearings on the support of indigenous peoples at the Russian Parliament.

On Thin Ice: Why the United States Needs to Invest in the Arctic

Brown Political Review published an article titled, “On Thin Ice: Why the United States Needs to Invest in the Arctic”. The article reads in part as follows:

Science: What keeps Arctic scientists awake at night? [Report]

Infosurhoy published an article titled, “Science: What keeps Arctic scientists awake at night? [Report]”. The article reads in part as follows:

In a year when Arctic warming rose to global prominence after temperatures hit a sweltering 32˚C inside the Arctic Circle, what are some of the specific issues that keep Arctic scientists awake at night?

Horizon caught up with eight experts in Reykjavik, Iceland, at the 6th edition of the Arctic Circle assembly, held between 19 and 21 October. The event brought together scientists, government officials, activists, business people, indigenous leaders and students to discuss a range of Arctic issues from climate change to sustainable development to security. We asked them what, in their views, are the most important challenges we face.

Overcoming challenges facing Polar Silk Road

China Daily published an article titled, “Overcoming challenges facing Polar Silk Road”. The article reads in part as follows:

Ballast water is dangerous for the Arctic environment since it contains a variety of invasive species that constitute a menace to the fragile flora and fauna in the Arctic and can displace local organisms and creatures, thus changing the whole structure of the feeding system.

Implementing China’s vision of a Polar Silk Road, therefore, requires solutions for ballast water treatment in order to make Arctic entrance for Chinese industries smooth and profitable. Ballast water management on the route from China to Europe has to address the issues of how to dispose of, how to clean and what mechanisms to apply in order to avoid illegal ballast water discharge in the Arctic.

China Expands Its Global Governance Ambitions in the Arctic

Chatham House published an article titled, “China Expands Its Global Governance Ambitions in the Arctic”. The article reads in part as follows:

As polar ice melts, the Arctic will become increasingly important for its untapped oil, gas and minerals as they become more accessible, as well for its shipping routes, which will become increasingly cost efficient for cargo as parts of the routes become ice-free for extended periods.

A number of countries, including Russia and China, are also exploring the possibilities around overflights, commercial fishing, the laying of submarine cables and pipelines, and scientific research.

Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2018

IISD Reporting Services published an article titled, “Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2018”. The article reads in part as follows:

Arctic biodiversity is under threat. Conserving this ecosystem requires a holistic approach and the involvement of non-Arctic states and stakeholders. In partnership with the Finish Ministry of the Environment, the 2nd Arctic Biodiversity Congress will take place from 9-12 October 2018 in Rovaniemi, Finland. Organized by the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) and the biodiversity working group of the Arctic Council, the Congress will foster a dialogue among key stakeholders working on the conservation of Arctic biodiversity, including scientists, indigenous peoples, policy-makers, governments officials, industry, students and civil society.

Russia’s New Commanding Role in the Arctic (Op-ed)

The Moscow Times published an article titled, “Russia’s New Commanding Role in the Arctic (Op-ed)”. The article reads in part as follows:

While Russia’s economy is increasingly burdened by Western sanctions, Moscow has recently made crucial headway with a new Arctic transport corridor, which could have far-reaching economic and geopolitical consequences.

Last month, Maersk, which is the world’s largest shipping firm, made headlines by sending its first cargo ship through Russia’s Northern Sea Route. The NSR links Asia to Europe, utilizing Russian waters in the Arctic Ocean.

Russia’s Plan To Boost North Sea Route Annual Cargo Challenging- Arctic Economic Council

UrduPoint published an article titled, “Russia’s Plan To Boost North Sea Route Annual Cargo Challenging- Arctic Economic Council”. The article reads in part as follows:

The goal to increase the shipping volume of Russia‘s Northern Sea Route to 80 million tonnes per year announced by RussianPresident Vladimir Putin is challenging and will require additional investment, Tero Vauraste, the vice chairman of the Arctic Economic Council, told Sputnik on Wednesday.

Earlier on Wednesday, Putin set out the key areas of development of the Russian Far East at the plenary session of the Eastern Economic Forum being held in Russia on September 11-13. In particular, the Russian president has ordered that the transportation between Europe and the Pacific Rim should be improved with the help of the Northern Sea Route, whose annual flow of goods should be increased to 80 million tonnes.

Nearly Fifth of Russia GDP Potential Comes From Arctic – Arctic Economic Council

Sputnik published an article titled, “Nearly Fifth of Russia GDP Potential Comes From Arctic – Arctic Economic Council”. The article reads in part as follows:

The fourth annual Eastern Economic Forum kicked off on September 11 in Russia’s Far East. The EEF has been held since 2015, and serves as a platform for developing political, financial and social ties between Russia and the Asia-Pacific region.

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