Trump Prepares to Unveil a Vast Reworking of Clean Water Protections

The New York Times published an article titled, “Trump Prepares to Unveil a Vast Reworking of Clean Water Protections”. The article reads in part as follows:

The Trump administration is expected on Tuesday to unveil a plan that would weaken federal clean water rules designed to protect millions of acres of wetlands and thousands of miles of streams nationwide from pesticide runoff and other pollutants.

Environmentalists say the proposal represents a historic assault on wetlands regulation at a moment when Mr. Trump has repeatedly voiced a commitment to “crystal-clean water.” The proposed new rule would chip away at safeguards put in place a quarter century ago, during the administration of President George H.W. Bush, who implemented a policy designed to ensure that no wetlands lost federal protection.

Responsibility for the Arctic from Afar

The Arctic Institute published an article titled, “Responsibility for the Arctic from Afar”. The article reads in part as follows:

The Expert Workshop “How to Protect the Arctic from Afar” reminded everyone that the Arctic is a large and diverse place, where things are nevertheless very much interconnected. That is true for regions, activities, and ecosystems in the Arctic. It is also true for the Arctic being connected, in manifold ways, to non-Arctic countries and regions, with their patterns of land use, production, and consumption. We find the Arctic to be strongly affected by emissions, resource extraction and use, industrial activities, policies and regulations, and conservation efforts in non-Arctic areas.

Arctic warming: More shipping, more risks to marine mammals

Yale Climate Connections published an article titled, “Arctic warming: More shipping, more risks to marine mammals”. The article reads in part as follows:

The high Arctic long has been seen as a vast, impassable span of ice accessed only by intrepid and daring explorers. But as more sea ice melts, the region is becoming more accessible, and travel by ship is now possible under certain conditions.

China’s role in Arctic governance ‘cannot be ignored

The Global Times published an article titled, “China’s role in Arctic governance ‘cannot be ignored”. The article reads in part as follows:

China has become a “rule maker” in the global governance of the Arctic, a blue paper said Thursday, calling on the country to “stay calm” and respond with action in the face of the hyped-up “China threat” theory.

Jointly released by Beijing-based Social Sciences Academic Press and Qingdao-based Ocean University of China on Thursday, the blue paper said China’s role in promoting global governance in the region cannot be ignored.

China eyes economic, strategic benefits in the Arctic

GBTIMES published an article titled, “China eyes economic, strategic benefits in the Arctic”. The article reads in part as follows:

China has become one of the rule makers in the Arctic region, while the Polar Silk Road shipping route can boost economic integration from Asia to Europe, according to a Chinese blue paper published on Thursday.

The book, titled The Arctic Blue Paper: Arctic Development Report (2017) and published by the Ocean University of China and the Social Sciences Academic Press, follows the Asian country’s first Arctic policy released earlier this year and its increased research and commercial activities in the region.

The long road from Arctic science to international law

ScienceNordic published an article titled, “The long road from Arctic science to international law”. The article reads in part as follows:

The second meeting of the Parties to the Minamata Convention on Mercury takes place this week in Switzerland. The road to the international convention took almost 15 years and is significantly influenced by Arctic research and Norwegian efforts.

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Hva er Arktisk råd? (‘What is the Arctic Council?’)

Fridtjof Nansen Institute published an article titled, “Hva er Arktisk råd? (‘What is the Arctic Council?’)”. The article reads in part as follows:

The Arctic Council (AC) is frequently referred to as the most important international forum in the Arctic. The AC has produced substantial knowledge on Arctic issues, and informed the debate on challenges and opportunities in the region, ranging from research on climate change, introduction of shipping guidelines and emphasizing regional health issues. It is a significant player in the region as a producer of knowledge, presenter of guidelines and recommendations, Arctic environment assessment and monitoring body, and arena for the drafting of binding international agreements. In this book I look closer at AC’s role in Arctic Governance.

International introductory course “Arctic Council and the role of Permanent participants” in Moscow

UArctic published an article titled, “International introductory course “Arctic Council and the role of Permanent participants” in Moscow”. The article reads in part as follows:

On November 16, representatives of the indigenous peoples of the North of Russia will come to Moscow to participate in the international introductory course “Arctic Council and the role of Permanent participants”. Officials of the Arctic Council will take part in the work. The seminar participants will get acquainted with the work of the Arctic Council and later, together with foreign guests, they will participate in the hearings on the support of indigenous peoples at the Russian Parliament.

On Thin Ice: Why the United States Needs to Invest in the Arctic

Brown Political Review published an article titled, “On Thin Ice: Why the United States Needs to Invest in the Arctic”. The article reads in part as follows:

Science: What keeps Arctic scientists awake at night? [Report]

Infosurhoy published an article titled, “Science: What keeps Arctic scientists awake at night? [Report]”. The article reads in part as follows:

In a year when Arctic warming rose to global prominence after temperatures hit a sweltering 32˚C inside the Arctic Circle, what are some of the specific issues that keep Arctic scientists awake at night?

Horizon caught up with eight experts in Reykjavik, Iceland, at the 6th edition of the Arctic Circle assembly, held between 19 and 21 October. The event brought together scientists, government officials, activists, business people, indigenous leaders and students to discuss a range of Arctic issues from climate change to sustainable development to security. We asked them what, in their views, are the most important challenges we face.