MITC office joins the Arctic Economic Council

Mainebiz posted an article titled, “MITC office joins the Arctic Economic Council.” The article reads as follows;

“The Maine North Atlantic Development Office at Maine International Trade Center is one of three new members of the Arctic Economic Council.

MENADO is the first AEC member coming from the lower 48 states in the United States.

The Arctic Economic Council is an independent organization based in Tromsø, Norway, that facilitates Arctic business-to-business activities and responsible economic development through the sharing of best practices, technological solutions, standards and other information. It supports market accessibility and provides advice and a business perspective to the work of the Arctic Council.

Maine North Atlantic Development Office joins Arctic Economic Council

Press Herald published an article online titled, “Maine North Atlantic Development Office joins Arctic Economic Council.” The article reads as follows;

“The Maine North Atlantic Development Office has joined the Arctic Economic Council, an independent agency aimed at business-to-business activities.

The development office was formed in 2013 under the auspices of the Maine International Trade Center to increase trade and investment between Maine and the North Atlantic region. It is the first organization in the Lower 48 states to join the Arctic Economic Council, according to a news release from the trade center. The Maine group joined the organization as a nonvoting member.

Arctic Economic Council welcomes three new members

Port News published an article titled, “Arctic Economic Council welcomes three new members.” The article reads as follows;

“The Arctic Economic Council says it is pleased to welcome three new members to the pan-Arctic business community. Bioway AS, MENADO and Cosco Shipping Lines Finland Oy represent different parts of the Arctic business community, thus further strengthening the AEC’s position as the representative of the width of Arctic business.

Bioway AS is an indigenously owned company within the aquaculture technology business with its headquarter in Norway. Bioway AS is welcomed as the first Permafrost Partner of the Arctic Economic Council.

Global Team Of Indigenous Leaders Work With Scientists To Monitor Climate Change’s Impact

KYUK published an article titled, “Global Team Of Indigenous Leaders Work With Scientists To Monitor Climate Change’s Impact.” The article reads in part as follows;

“Yesterday, a global team of indigenous leaders, scientists, and wildlife managers gathered at Bethel’s Cultural Center to discuss climate change’s growing impact on the Arctic’s plants and animals.

The working group on the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna, or CAFF, is a group that monitors circumpolar biodiversity. It tracks the health of shorebirds, polar bears, and native plants, then recommends sustainable practices to Arctic countries. Representatives from eight different countries are attending the meeting, along with advisors from several indigenous organizations.

Does Québec Need the Arctic Council?

World Policy Blog posted an article titled, “Does Québec Need the Arctic Council?” The article reads in part as follows;

“At the 2014 Arctic Circle Assembly, in front of more than 2,000 participants from 50 countries, Philippe Couillard, premier of Québec, highlighted the province’s commitment to Arctic matters, stating, “We want, and we will be, part of the dialogue on Arctic and Nordic issues.” Playing a role in the formation of Arctic policy has been an integral part of Québec’s efforts to claim a voice on the international stage. Couillard’s words asserted his position as a key sub-national leader in Arctic issues and illustrated Québec’s determination for a seat at the Arctic negotiating table.

Romantic notions about the Arctic must include Indigenous rights

National Post published an article online titled, “Romantic notions about the Arctic must include Indigenous rights.” The article reads in part as follows;

“The Arctic is many things to many people. In Canada, this malleability has made the region an incredibly valuable vehicle for nation-building and identity construction.

As a Newfoundland-born international politics scholar and author who researches Canada’s relationship with the Arctic, I believe that very pliability of the Arctic is an important feature of Canadian society, one that’s been cultivated for decades. The Arctic has intrigued many of us for myriad reasons since Confederation.

World Policy On Air, Ep. 134: “Innovation at the Arctic Council”

World Policy Blog uploaded a podcast titled, “World Policy On Air, Ep. 134: ‘Innovation at the Arctic Council.'” The podcast discusses the following:

“In 1987, Mikhail Gorbachev became the first major political figure to deliver a speech on Arctic issues, setting in motion a process to establish a regional governance body. This week on World Policy On Air, Nadine Fabbi, lead for the International Policy Institute Arctic Fellows program, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington, discusses the progress the Arctic Council has made after 30 years of operation.”

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Stronger Together: Weaving Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science

World Policy blog posted an article titled, “Stronger Together: Weaving Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science.” The article reads in part as follows;

“As the president of the Saami Council, Áile Javo, reminded the Arctic Council in 2015, “neither science nor traditional knowledge alone can provide the answers needed to face the impacts of Arctic change.” Since its founding, the Arctic Council has recognized the importance of working with both Western science and Indigenous Knowledge, also referred to as Traditional Knowledge, to address challenges in the Arctic. But the process of incorporating two different knowledge systems into Arctic Council research and projects has proven difficult and slow.

No PAME No Gain for Indigenous Groups

World Plicy Blog uploaded an article titled, “No PAME No Gain for Indigenous Groups.” The article reads in part as follows;

“We all know the Arctic is melting. What is not clear is whether indigenous rights are disappearing alongside it. The retreating ice has attracted interest as new shipping routes and fishing areas become more accessible, and the potential for discovering and extracting from natural resource reserves increases. As attention is drawn to economic opportunities, environmentalists are pushing to protect marine ecosystems from further harm. But as these interests converge in the Arctic, the role of indigenous groups has become muddled and their voices subdued. An open discussion with all stakeholders is required to form sustainable solutions, and the Protection of Arctic Marine Environment (PAME) Working Group of the Arctic Council is designed for that purpose.

Breaking the Ice for Indigenous Voices on the World Stage

World Policy Blog posted an article titled, “Breaking the Ice for Indigenous Voices on the World Stage.” The article reads in part as follows;

“‘Inuit with our fellow Indigenous Peoples are not stakeholders. We are the main players’. This is how J. Okalik Eegeesiak, current chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, ended her February 2016 speech titled ‘An Inuit Vision of the Arctic in 2045‘ in front of the Wilton Park international forum in London. Unfortunately, her description of indigenous peoples’ roles is not reflected in state policies anywhere in the world. Today, indigenous representatives continue to struggle to make their voices heard in a system that favors state-centric forms of governance and Westphalian concepts of nationhood and sovereignty. The creation of the Arctic Council, however, may have broken the ice for indigenous groups by promoting a higher level of participation in both regional and international institutions.