As Arctic warms, reindeer herders tangle with new industries

Japan Times published an article titled, “As Arctic warms, reindeer herders tangle with new industries”. The article reads in part as follows:

When he’s not out on the Arctic tundra with his 2,000 reindeer, his dog and Whitney Houston blasting through his headphones, Nils Mathis Sara is often busy explaining to people how a planned copper mine threatens his livelihood.

Along with other Sami herders and fishermen, the 60-year-old is in a standoff with the mine owners, Norwegian officials and many townspeople that is, after six years, coming to a head.

U.S-Canada trade feud threatens fragile Arctic economies, council says

 iPolitics published an article titled, “U.S-Canada trade feud threatens fragile Arctic economies, council says”. The article reads in part as follows:

The body representing all eight of the world’s Arctic nations is expressing alarm about increasing trade tension between Canada and the United States.

The Trump administration fired the first shots by imposing a 25 per cent tariff on steel and a 10 per cent tariff on aluminum as a protection against what it called a “national security threat.” In response, Canada declared $16 billion in tariffs on a long list of American goods. The exchange has prompted the Arctic Economic Council to urge both nations to consider the effects of a global trade war on their northern communities.

China & Russia In The Arctic: Axis Of Ambivalence

 PortNews published an article titled, “China & Russia In The Arctic: Axis Of Ambivalence”. The article reads in part as follows:

China and Russia are working together ever more closely in the Arctic, exploiting a policy vacuum in the US, an international panel of experts said here. But Sino-Russian cooperation is almost entirely commercial, focused on trade routes, offshore oil, telecommunications (most satellites don’t cover the Arctic), and tourism. A military alliance is unlikely given Russia’s deep ambivalence about China’s growing influence in general and their very different views on who should run the Arctic in particular: the eight circumpolar countries alone — including both Russia and the US — or a larger group that includes self-declared “near-Arctic” nations like China.

Announcing: Polar Silk Road Watch

Polar Silk Road Watch, a project of the Pan Arctic Forum, evaluates China’s compliance with the obligations it set for itself in its Arctic Policy white paper. Of particular interest to PSR Watch is China’s growing participation in:

  1. Arctic Governance.
  2. Arctic Development.

Caution In The High North: Geopolitical And Economic Challenges Of The Arctic Maritime Environment

War On The Rocks published an article titled, “Caution In The High North: Geopolitical And Economic Challenges Of The Arctic Maritime Environment”. The article reads in part as follows:

At the 2011 Arctic Forum, then-Prime Minister Vladimir Putin expressed his maritime ambitions for the Arctic by declaring, “The shortest route between Europe’s largest markets and the Asia-Pacific region lie across the Arctic.” He went on to add, “the Northern Sea Route … will rival traditional trade lanes.”

What Does China’s Fifth Research Station Mean for Antarctic Governance?

The Diplomat published an article titled, “What Does China’s Fifth Research Station Mean for Antarctic Governance?”. The article reads in part as follows:

On February 7, 2018, during China’s 34th Antarctic Expedition, Chinese researchers laid the foundation of China’s fifth Antarctic research station on Inexpressible Island in Terra Nova Bay of the Ross Sea. It is expected that construction will be completed in 2022. China’s fifth station is designed to be a year-round research base, which could accommodate 80 people in the summer and 30 people in winter.

Could science diplomacy be the key to stabilizing international relations?

The Conversation published an article titled, “Could science diplomacy be the key to stabilizing international relations?”. The article reads in part as follows:

It’s no secret that United States–Russia relations are currently rife with tension and mistrust. The news is full of reports of Russia meddling in U.S. elections, seeding U.S. media with fake news, supporting the Syrian regime and so on.

The relationship between the two countries has reached an all-time low since the fall of the Soviet Union, with some going so far as to call it a new “cold war.” Diplomats have been unable to mend the relationship, as national security interests on each side are too narrow to provide common ground.

U.S. Still Lags Behind in Preparing for a Changing Arctic

Scientific American published an article titled, “U.S. Still Lags Behind in Preparing for a Changing Arctic”. The article reads in part as follows:

The Coast Guard says it’s making good progress in the Arctic, an unusually upbeat assessment after years of warning that a warmer North Pole will attract more ships than the coasties can handle.

Those new assurances were cold comfort to lawmakers and experts at yesterday’s House Transportation subcommittee hearing, who portrayed the United States as lagging behind other global powers that recognize climate change will transform the Arctic into a critical hub for shipping, fishing and drilling.

Arctic Economic Council expresses concern over signs of increased protectionism

 PortNews published an article titled, “Arctic Economic Council expresses concern over signs of increased protectionism”. The article reads in part as follows:

The Arctic Economic Council (AEC) expresses its concern regarding the recent signs of increased protectionism in global trade. The most recent proof is the U.S. announcement regarding a 25 per cent tariff for imports of steel and 10 per cent tariff for imports of aluminum. Establishment of new tariffs will potentially have wide-ranging implications for the global economy and cross-border commerce. Furthermore, they may also have negative cumulative effects on Arctic trade.

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New Arctic Science Cooperation Agreement Comes into Force

Eos published an article titled, “New Arctic Science Cooperation Agreement Comes into Force”. The article reads in part as follows:

Scientists and diplomats are applauding a new agreement on international scientific cooperation in the Arctic, which entered into force on Wednesday. They said it will help to advance Arctic research across borders and reduce obstacles to research at a time when the region is undergoing rapid changes. Administrative obstacles sometimes have blocked or delayed scientists from having access to Arctic research sites in other countries, they noted.