Report: Empowered Arctic Communities Are More Resilient to Change

Arctic Deeply posted an article titled, “Report: Empowered Arctic Communities Are More Resilient to Change.” The article reads in part as follows;

Temperatures in Arviat, Nunavut, a hamlet on the western shore of Hudson Bay, rose to –1C (30F) this week. The warm weather was unusual for this time of year, said Nancy Karetak-Lindell, who lives there.

‘It makes it unsafe to travel [on the ice]. This means that my father’s and grandfather’s advice no longer applies when it comes to safe travel’, said Karetak-Lindell, who is the president of the Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. ‘We Inuit people are known to be extremely resilient, but what we are seeing right now, due to climate change, is too much to take in one generation’.

The U.S. Arctic Council Chairmanship: Changes from One Administration to Another?

World Policy blog posted an article titled, “The U.S. Arctic Council Chairmanship: Changes from One Administration to Another?” The article reads in part as follows;

“As the United States prepared to take the rotating chairmanship of the Arctic Council for the second time, observers noted the 2015-2017 term would straddle two administrations. President Barack Obama’s considerable efforts to deal with the enormous threats of climate change did not ignore the Arctic. A Trump administration’s treatment of Arctic issues remains to be seen, but the looser environmental regulations he promises will exacerbate environmental threats to the planet.

The Rush To Regulate Oil And Gas Accelerates As Jan. 20 Approaches

Forbes published an article online titled, “The Rush To Regulate Oil And Gas Accelerates As Jan. 20 Approaches.” The article reads in part as follows;

“Since election day delivered the realization that President Obama’s two terms in office would be succeeded by a Republican rather than a fellow Democrat, the Administration’s regulatory agencies have accelerated their efforts to cram through as many last-minute regulations as possible.  Nowhere has this effort been more focused than on the oil and natural gas industry.

Since November 8, we have already seen the following events take place:

Scientists as Diplomats – Adaptive Challenges in the Changing Arctic

Arctic Deeply published an article titled, “Scientists as Diplomats – Adaptive Challenges in the Changing Arctic.” The article reads in part as follows;

The end of the Cold War led to a period of enhanced scientific cooperation in the Arctic between former opponents. This joint work brought us insights into areas such as climate change, Arctic fisheries and new energy resources, to name a few. It helped us understand the rapid environmental implications of a changing, relatively uncharted territory, as well as improving policymaking and environmental security. Two of the milestones are the Arctic Search and Rescue Agreement and the Agreement on Cooperation on Marine Oil Pollution. This work also showed that science can create a common ground among states with shared interests, even when their governments fiercely disagree on a multitude of other geopolitical questions.

Global Economy & Governance Conference convened at Ocean University of China 

Editor’s Note: As the research identified below is completed we are interested in being informed of its accessibility. Contact us at contact@thecre.com                 

The meeting covers the areas of environmental, social responsibility and governance, big data of economy and finance, international finance, capital asset pricing, behavioral finance, corporate finance, financial investment, information sci-tech and E-governance, market management, public governance and law. About 300 experts and young scholars participated in the meeting from 35 universities and research institutes like Taiwan University and Renmin University of China as well as from the countries of Romania, USA, the Netherlands, UK, Spain and Turkey. In addition to the keynote speeches, different topics were discussed in 24 sessions.

MPs to turn up heat on UK Arctic role to ensure Scotland doesn’t lose out

The National published an article titled, “MPs to turn up heat on UK Arctic role to ensure Scotland doesn’t lose out.” The article reads in part as follows;

“A group of MPs has launched an inquiry into the High North – also known as the Arctic region – which they say is likely to play an important role in the future of Scotland.

The area roughly comprises the oceans and territories of the Arctic Circle and Westminster’s Scottish Affairs Committee said the UK had not publicly stated an official policy on it since 2013. That was when the Foreign Office published a report called the UK’s Policy towards the Arctic, which was produced without Scottish Government input.

French pension investors call for moratorium on Arctic oil, gas activity

Investment & Pensions Europe posted an article titled, “French pension investors call for moratorium on Arctic oil, gas activity.” The article reads in part as follows;

“French pension investors and asset managers are at the forefront of a call for an indefinite moratorium on oil and gas activity in the Arctic high seas from a international group of institutional investors.

Nineteen investors* with more than €5trn in combined assets under management are backing the initiative, led by French pension investors ERAFP, Ircantec and Préfon, as well as Natixis Asset Management and its responsible investment arm Mirova.

Arctic Council to Stay Course on Climate Change After U.S. Election

Arctic Deeply published an article titled, “Arctic Council to Stay Course on Climate Change After U.S. Election.” The article reads in part as follows; 

“Despite the opposing positions on climate change adopted by Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, a senior U.S. official has expressed confidence that the United States’ efforts to curb the effects of global warming over the course of its chairmanship of the Arctic Council will transcend the political transition in Washington.

Arctic Yearbook 2016 looks at Arctic Council in its 20th year

NunatsiaqOnline posted an article titled, “Arctic Yearbook 2016 looks at Arctic Council in its 20th year.”  The article reads in part as follows;

“If you want to know more about the past, present and future of the Arctic Council, now in its 20th year, a new 400-plus-page online publication gives you plenty to think about.

The Arctic Yearbook—an international effort—has been published annually since 2012 with the goal of providing critical analysis on Arctic politics, governance and security.

In 2016, the Arctic Yearbook aims to offer “the most substantial evaluation of the Arctic Council ever published.”

Arctic Yearbook 2016: focus on Arctic Council

Radio Canada International published an article titled, “Arctic Yearbook 2016: focus on Arctic Council.” The article reads as follows;

“Arctic policy wonks can finally get their fix of northern policy and analysis as the latest edition of the Arctic Yearbook hit the proverbial Internet stands over the weekend.

“The Arctic Yearbook seeks the preeminent repository of critical analysis on the Arctic region, with a mandate to inform observers about the state of Arctic politics, governance and security,” the open-access publication claims on its site.

The open-access online publication offers a mix of peer-reviewed scholarly articles, shorter commentary and briefs written by experts and policy makers for a less specialized but still Arctic-savvy reader.