Five Arctic nations back ‘peaceful’ dialogue over disputes

Prothom Alo published an article titled, “Five Arctic nations back ‘peaceful’ dialogue over disputes”. The article reads in part as follows:

The five nations bordering the Arctic Ocean on Tuesday reaffirmed their commitment made in Greenland a decade ago to “peacefully” settle their differences over the resource-rich region threatened by climate change.

Ministers and senior officials from the United States, Canada, Russia, Denmark and Norway gathered for a two-day meeting in western Greenland’s coastal town of Ilulissat, where the initial declaration was signed on May 28, 2008.

The countries hope dialogue will resolve conflicts over the sovereignty of territories, strategic maritime passages, environmental protection and fishing.

Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation enters into force

PostNews published an article titled, “Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation enters into force”. The article reads in part as follows:

The Arctic Council marks a special occasion on 23 May 2018 as the “Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation,” signed in May 2017, enters into force.

In 2013, the Arctic Council announced that it would begin work towards an arrangement on improved scientific research cooperation. At that time, it was not a foregone conclusion that this work would lead to the third binding agreement negotiated under the auspices of the Arctic Council; that step was taken at the ninth Arctic Council Ministerial meeting in Iqaluit, Canada in 2015.

Constitutional and Statutory Limits for Cost-Benefit Analysis Pursuant to Executive Orders 12,291 and 12,498

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review published an article titled, “Constitutional and Statutory Limits for Cost-Benefit Analysis Pursuant to Executive Orders 12,291 and 12,498”. The article reads in part as follows:

“Shortly after his inauguration in 1981, President Ronald Reagan presented his scheme for economic recovery before a joint session of Congress.  In that presentation, the President identified the costs federal regulations impose on government and industry as one of the major causes of the nation’s economic woes.  He quoted estimates that regulatory costs would ultimately reach nearly 100 billion dollars.

The Ice Dragon: China’s Arctic Policy

Geopolitical Monitor published an article titled, “The Ice Dragon: China’s Arctic Policy”. The article reads in part as follows:

“The Arctic Circle’s once inhospitable environment is changing dramatically, and the geopolitics of the region is shifting with it. Russia planted their flag on the seabed of the North Pole in 2007 and have been building up military installments ever since. China has been interested in the Arctic since the 1980s, and in January this year, published its first white paper on the region. President Trump, with his “America First” campaign and denial of global warming, has left behind various vacuums for other nations to pursue their interests. This is particularly true of the Arctic.