Arctic Council to meet amid drilling concerns

The Detroit News posted an article titled, “Arctic Council to meet amid drilling concerns.” The article reads in part as follows;

“High-level officials from the world’s eight Arctic nations will meet in Alaska amid concerns about the future of the sensitive region after President Donald Trump called for more oil drilling and development.

Among those expected to attend the meeting of the Arctic Council beginning Thursday in Fairbanks are U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, who met Wednesday with Trump and Tillerson in Washington.

Syria to dominate talks between Russian, US top diplomats in Washington

Russian News Agency posted an article titled, “Syria to dominate talks between Russian, US top diplomats in Washington.” The article reads as follows;

“Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov will hold talks with US State Secretary Rex Tillerson in Washington on Wednesday, with focus on the Syria crisis, topical international and bilateral issues. Lavrov has arrived in the United States on a three-day working visit.

‘The talks with US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson are scheduled for May 10 in Washington. At the talks, (the top diplomats) will exchange views on topical international issues and pressing issues of bilateral relations’, the ministry said.

Arctic Diplomacy – Daily engagement in support of our Shared North

The Arctic Institute posted an article titled, “Arctic Diplomacy – Daily engagement in support of our Shared North.” The article reads in part as follows;

“When thinking of Arctic diplomacy, one is drawn to the significant work of the Arctic Council.  One may also think of the United Nations system and the important work being done under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea to settle claims related to the continental shelf.  What is often forgotten in the mix of Arctic politics and diplomacy is the central role of bilateral relations in advancing cooperation and understanding between nations and people in the High North. In my view, Arctic diplomacy is about connections and people.

The Arctic – an Increasingly Hot Topic

The Huffington Post published an article titled, “The Arctic – an Increasingly Hot Topic.” The article reads in part as follows;

“What comes to mind when you think of the Arctic? A cold and remote place, largely void of life and opportunities?

Or have you joined the growing number of world leaders, scientists and corporate executives who see the Arctic as a promising, prosperous and increasingly vibrant region? One where responsible and joint management is the key to unlocking a vast potential?

Why Russia’s Indigenous People Are Wary of National Parks

Arctic Deeply posted an article titled, “Why Russia’s Indigenous People Are Wary of National Parks.” The article reads in part as follows;

Russia’s Numto Nature reserve in western Siberia contains a sacred lake, endangered cranes and valuable wetlands for the Nenet and Khanty peoples. The area was also the site of an Indigenous rebellion against the Soviet state during the 1930s, in protest at forced collectivization and the persecution of traditional leaders. Last year, the nature reserve’s borders were redrawn by the regional government to make way for new drilling operations for the oil company Surgutneftegas, forcing out Indigenous groups once again. In protest, reindeer herders recently built a traditional tent in the heart of Moscow.

Arctic Economic Council Invites World Ocean Council Input on Sustainable Development

The Arctic Journal published a press release titled, “Arctic Economic Council Invites World Ocean Council Input on Sustainable Development.” It reads in part as follows;

“The AEC Annual Meeting convenes all the business representatives from the 8 Arctic States and 6 indigenous organizations. At this 3rd AEC Annual Meeting, for the first time non-voting members and several outside presentations were invited.

US Vows Commitment to Arctic Climate Change Research

VOANews published an article titled, “US Vows Commitment to Arctic Climate Change Research.” The article reads in part as follows;

“The United States will participate in advancing climate change research in the Arctic, a State Department official said on Monday, ahead of a summit of Arctic nations later this week where Washington’s commitment to tackling climate change will likely be questioned.

The administration of President Donald Trump, who has taking steps to bolster the U.S. oil and coal industries, is reviewing former President Barack Obama’s plans to curb climate change.

Arctic Council ministerial – View from Canada

The Independent Barents Observer posted an article titled, “Arctic Council ministerial – View from Canada.” The article reads in part as follows;

“The United States hands the Arctic Council’s two-year rotating chairmanship to Finland on May 11th in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Foreign ministers from all eight Arctic states: Canada, Finland, Denmark/Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russia and the United States are scheduled to attend the ministerial meeting where the accomplishments of the last two years will be announced and the forum’s leadership is officially passed on.

  • But what should we be watching for as circumpolar politicians, diplomats and indigenous leaders gather in Fairbanks?

The future is next week

The Arctic Journal published an article titled, “The future is next week.” The article reads in part as follows;

“Mention a biennial Arctic event taking place next week, and Fairbanks, Alaska, and the Arctic Council’s big meeting is likely to come to mind. But for those with ties to Greenland, and in particular those whose business is making money, Nuuk will be the place to be, as it hosts the fifth Future Greenland conference on May 9 and 10.

As in the past, the main point of this year’s gathering is to bring together political and commercial leaders in one room and get them to explain how they can help each other accomplish their goals.

The indigenous Arctic: We are the edge

The Daily News- Miner posted an article titled, “The indigenous Arctic: We are the edge.” The article reads in part as follows;

“Alaska just experienced the third consecutive hottest year on record. Because we are warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet, Arctic sea ice is also melting faster than expected, causing an increase to sea-level rise. Our elders, with a skill base of traditional knowledge, hand in hand with conservation practices dating back thousands of years, witnessed these changes and began forecasting potential impacts back in the late 1960s. When communicated to scientists and policy shapers, their words landed as if they were dust or blown snow.