Arctic Council upgrade

The Arctic Journal posted an article titled, “Arctic Council upgrade.” The article reads in part as follows;

“As the Arctic Council celebrates its 20th anniversary, we acknowledge its many positive scientific and policy-shaping accomplishments and look to greater Arctic cooperation to govern this unique region of the planet for sustainability. The rapid and significant changes in the Arctic, from melting ice to economic development have drawn global attention to the region, and to the Arctic Council as the central mechanism for responding to these changes.

The Arctic is Back into Play

The issuance of a final regulation is not necessarily the last word on a public policy issue since it  can always be changed.

In the case of the Arctic drilling, it is going to be revisited by the incoming Administration.   ABC News quotes this statement by the Secretary of the Interior Zinke during his confirmation hearings:

President-elect Donald Trump’s choice to head the Department of Interior said today that he would consider reversing a decision from the Obama administration last year to halt oil and gas drilling in the Arctic, a move that could allow fossil fuel development in region.

A Pathway to Better Collaboration Between Northern Leaders

Arctic Deeply released an article titled, “A Pathway to Better Collaboration Between Northern Leaders.” The article reads in part as follows;

The Institute of the North is committed to advancing Arctic issues related to sustainable development as part of a strategic, inclusive and collaborative approach. This means improving the quality of life for northern residents via economic development, while ensuring that protective environmental measures are in place and the traditional and cultural heritage of the region is respected. The trends within both the United States and Canada have been toward a series of high-level policies, strategies and implementation plans that have tried to frame the critical issues in the Arctic.

Trump, Russia and the Arctic

Russia Direct posted an article titled, “Trump, Russia and the Arctic.” The article reads in part as follows;

“With Donald Trump’s inauguration fast approaching, there is still no telling what his presidency will really be like. Policy forecasts in this regard can only be speculation. However, the signals he has been giving out during his campaign, the appointments he has made since then and the expectations of his foreign counterparts give some indications of the course international relations might take during his upcoming term.

International Cooperation Robust in the Arctic

Global Trade posted an article online titled, “International Cooperation Robust in the Arctic.” The article reads in part as follows;

“The relationship between Russia and the west entered crisis mode in March 2014 when Russia formally annexed Crimea and has sinve further declined.

But cooperation remains robust on matters involving the Arctic. An article that appeared in The Polar Connection explains why.

Some Perspective on the U.S.-Canada Joint Statement on the Arctic

Arctic Deeply published an article titled, “Some Perspective on the U.S.-Canada Joint Statement on the Arctic.” The article reads in part as follows;

Canadian cooperation with the United States in the Arctic – on issues ranging from military security to economic development to the role of indigenous peoples to joint scientific research – is a historic Canadian asset and interest.

The December 2016 joint statement by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President Barack Obama brought a new, sharper focus and a formal bilateral approach to climate change, conservation and sustainable development.

How Russian advances in the Arctic are leaving NATO behind

CBC news released an article titled, “How Russian advances in the Arctic are leaving NATO behind.” The article reads in part as follows;

“As Russian cyber activities in the United States and military intervention in Syria dominate headlines, the Russian bear has pursued a steady march forward much closer to Canada, in the Arctic.

Russia moved ahead with several steps in its Arctic strategy in 2016, refurbishing military bases, constructing new airfields and building outports. A key element of this policy came together in June, when Russia launched its new nuclear-powered icebreaker in St. Petersburg.

What We’ll Be Watching in the Arctic in 2017

Arctic Deeply released an article titled, “What We’ll Be Watching in the Arctic in 2017.” The article reads in part as follows;

The past year offered some big surprises in the Arctic, whether it was the winter’s freakishly warm weather in the polar region or the recent decision by Canada and the United States to ban offshore drilling in most of their Arctic waters. While we don’t have a crystal ball, here are some issues we’ll be looking at in the coming year.

Sea ice experts expressed their alarm at the Arctic’s bizarre warmth over the past two months, and this is expected to have consequences for 2017.

Lessons for the South China Sea From International Experience in the Arctic

Foreign Policy posted an article online titled, “Lessons for the South China Sea From International Experience in the Arctic.” The article reads in part as follows,

“The recent row between the Chinese and the U.S. navies over an unmanned underwater vehicle is a glimpse of an evolving problem, which the new administration in the White House must address: The East and South China Sea currently constitute the primary global hotspot where major and regional powers’ vital interests and commitments clash directly.

Moving forward

The Arctic journal published an article titled, “Moving Forward.” The article reads in part as follows;

“Paradoxically, the emergence of Arctic co-operation was assisted, to a large extent, by the fact that the region was a global periphery – albeit a theatre for strategic and geo-political games between the big powers. The collapse of the Soviet Union contributed to the audacious 1987 speech by Mikhail Gorbachev in Murmansk, whereby he was envisaging a peaceful and environmentally sound Arctic.